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Science

Science - our intent

At Iveson everyone learns, achieves and aspires! This is seen in our science curriculum through a range of different ways.

We ensure that all children feel that they are scientists and have a clear understanding that they can aspire to become one in the future through our teaching, where Science Capital is at the forefront of the curriculum celebrating diversity and equality throughout. We also broaden their science capital by providing children with a science curriculum that fits into other subject disciplines especially STEM, so that children are provided with the skills so that they can be equipped for the future. An inclusive approach to learning through a no ceiling approach to differentiation, including the most able and children with SEND, where writing is not at the forefront, but where children learn through practical investigations in order to answer and ask questions through rich conversations. Science lessons at Iveson inspire all children to ask questions, make links and ensure a deeper understanding of the world around them from the day they start school. Providing children with the vocabulary to articulate their findings, their scientific knowledge and reflect on their scientific processes is imperative to ensure they develop their science capital. This will further be enhanced through real life experiences, such as visitors to the school and educational trips, where they can enhance their knowledge further and make links to their learning inside the classroom. We also ensure that outdoor learning is fed into the curriculum with Alfresco learning, which makes explicit links to the science curriculum, to make learning creative and develop their scientific enquiry skills and vocabulary further. Children will be encouraged to take responsibility for their scientific practices and to consistently link their growing knowledge to wider concerns around climate change, sustainability and globalisation. 

 

Science lessons at Iveson should inspire all children to ask questions, make links and ensure a deeper understanding of the world around them from the day they start school.

Iveson Primary School

Early Years Science 

 Nursery (3 and 4 year olds) Children should:  

Communication and language  
Understand ‘why’ questions, like: “Why do you think the caterpillar got so fat?” 

Personal Social and Emotional Development  
Make healthy choices about food, drink, activity and toothbrushing. 

Understanding the World 
Use all their senses in hands-on exploration of natural materials.  

  • Explore collections of materials with similar and/or different properties. 
  • Talk about what they see, using a wide vocabulary.
  • Begin to make sense of their own life-story and family’s history.
  • Explore how things work. 
  • Plant seeds and care for growing plants. 
  • Understand the key features of the life cycle of a plant and an animal.
  • Begin to understand the need to respect and care for the natural environment and all living things.
  • Explore and talk about different forces they can feel.
  • Talk about the differences between materials and changes they notice

 

Reception (4 and 5 year olds)- Children should:  

Communication and Language 
• Learn new vocabulary.  

  • Ask questions to find out more and to check what has been said to them. 
  • Articulate their ideas and thoughts in well-formed sentences. • Describe events in some detail. 
  • Use talk to help work out problems and organise thinking and activities, and to explain how things work and why they might happen. 
  • Use new vocabulary in different contexts.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development  
Know and talk about the different factors that support their overall health and wellbeing: – regular physical activity – healthy eating – toothbrushing – sensible amounts of ‘screen time’ – having a good sleep routine – being a safe pedestrian 

Understanding the World 
• Explore the natural world around them.  

  • Describe what they see, hear and feel while they are outside.
  • Recognise some environments that are different to the one in which they live.
  • Understand the effect of changing seasons on the natural world around them.

 

ELG 

Communication and language  

Listen, Attention and Understanding  

Make comments about what they have heard and ask questions to clarify their understanding. 

Personal Social and Emotional  

Managing Self 

Manage their own basic hygiene and personal needs, including dressing, going to the toilet and understanding the importance of healthy food choices. 

 

Understanding the World 

The Natural World 

• Explore the natural world around them, making observations and drawing pictures of animals and plants.  

• Know some similarities and differences between the natural world around them and contrasting environments, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class.  

• Understand some important processes and changes in the natural world around them, including the seasons and changing states of matter 

National Curriculum Intent A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes. 

 Aims 

 The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:  

  1. Develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  2. Develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them 
  3. Are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.

 Key Stage 1- Year 1 and 2  

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1. 

 Lower Key Stage 2- Years 3 and 4 

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out. ‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing word reading and spelling knowledge.  

KS2- Years 5 and 6  

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings. ‘Working and thinking scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.  

 

Talk to us

If you’d like to find out more about our school, arrange a visit or make a general enquiry email us at: parentcontact@iveson-primary.co.uk or use our handy form.